Public Spaces Protection Orders

We can issue a public spaces protection order (PSPO) to deal with a particular nuisance or problem within the borough.

We may do this when behaviour in an area is:

  • Unreasonable
  • On-going
  • Harming the quality of life of those in the community

A PSPO sets restrictions on how an area is used. These restrictions apply to everyone and make sure that the law-abiding majority can enjoy public spaces, safe from anti-social behaviour.

Current PSPOs

Dog control at Tilgate Park

All dogs are required to be kept on a lead (maximum 2m) around Tilgate lake, main lawn, Peace Garden and the golf course (excluding the perimeter path) at all times. No dogs are permitted in the children’s playground.  

Authorised police and council officers have the authority to issue fixed penalty notices for PSPO breaches.

It is an offence if you do not put and keep your dog on a lead while within the restricted area when requested to do so by an authorised officer. Any person found guilty is liable to a Fixed Penalty Notice up to £100. If it is not paid, they may be taken to court and receive a fine not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale (currently £1000).  
 

Car cruising

Authorised police and council officers have the authority to issue fixed penalty notices for PSPOs. It is an offence for a person to engage in any activity prohibited by PSPOs. Any person found guilty is liable to a Fixed Penalty Notice up to £100. If it is not paid, they may be taken to court and fined up to £1000.

It is an offence for a person to engage in any car cruising activity prohibited by the PSPO.

Alcohol consumption

The PSPO prohibits the consumption of alcohol where it contributes to or is linked to or is associated with nuisance or annoyance to members of the public, or where it contributes to or is linked to or is associated with disorder.

Police and authorised council officers can require a person not to consume alcohol in breach of the order. Officers can require a person to surrender anything in their possession which is, or which the officer reasonably believes to be alcohol or a container for alcohol. An officer can dispose of anything surrendered to them.

Any person who fails without reasonable excuse to comply with a request by an officer to either stop drinking or to surrender their drink may be guilty of a criminal offence. Police and authorised council officers can issue a £100 fixed penalty notice to any person they have reason to believe has committed this offence. If this is not paid within 14 days, they may be taken to court and receive a fine not exceeding level 2 on the standard scale (currently £500).

It is an offence to fail to stop drinking or surrender alcohol when required to do so by a Police or authorised council officer.